Art for the People. Since 2005.
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Upcoming Shows at Cactus Gallery


Something Wild in My Garden
Featured artist: Olga Ponomarenko
Scheduled to run: June 10 - July 15, 2017
RECEPTION: Saturday, June 10 * 6p-9p
Something in My Garden will be exploring the plight of urban wildlife. Many of our furry and feathered friends have been evicted from their habitat by an exploding human population who in their search for progress are destroying their natural environment. In turn wildlife are forced into ‘residential areas’, placing their own and their neighbors’ pets in jeopardy, in order to find food for survival. 
Participating artists:
Jaclyn Alderete, Douglas Alvarez, Ulla Anobile, Julie B, Lea Barozzi, Skye Becker-Yamakawa, Terri Berman, Denise Bledsoe, Andrea Bogdan, Debra Broz, Lacey Bryant, Ivonne Carley, Joe Carrion, Gigi Chen, Jon Ching, Nancy Cintron, Joshua Coffy, Henry T. Cram, Ashley Fisher, Rosie Garcia, Valency Genis, Corrie Gregory, Patrick Haemmerlein, Annette Hassell, Anita Inverarity, Brooke Kent, Lydia Moon Hee Kim, Patricia Krebs, Mavis Leahy, Malathip, Nichol Norman, Janet Olenik, Sarah Polzin, Olga Ponomarenko, Myriam Powell, Johnny Quintanilla, Jen Raven, Meghan Ritchey, Bobby Rojas, Joshua Roman, Lena Sayadian, Corina St. Martin, Kelly Thompson, Yuki Toy, Juliette Vaissiere, Kelly Vetter, Joe Vollan, Michelle Waters, Emily Wenner, and Holly Wood.
P i n o c c h i o
Featured artist: Joe Alvarez
Scheduled to run: August 12 - September 9
RECEPTION: Saturday, August 12 * 6p-9p
PINOCCHIO will be exploring the important lessons learned during Pinocchio's misadventures and the carnival of colorful characters that guided him to discover the true meaning of being human.

BACKGROUND INFO:

Pinocchio was a wooden marionette and the protagonist of the children's novel The Adventures of Pinocchio (1883) by Italian writer Carlo Collodi. Carved by a woodcarver named Geppetto in a village near Florence, he was created as a wooden puppet but dreamed of becoming a real boy. The piece of wood from which he was created is animated, so Pinocchio moves independently.

Pinocchio's bad behavior, rather than being charming or endearing, is meant to serve as a warning. Collodi originally intended the story to be a tragedy. It concluded with the puppet’s execution. Pinocchio’s enemies, the Fox and the Cat, bind his arms, pass a noose around his throat, and hang him from the branch of an oak tree.

Pinocchio was basically good, but he often got carried away hanging around with bad company, though he always managed to get out. Pinocchio undergoes transformations during the novel: he promises The Fairy with Turquoise Hair to become a real boy, flees with Candlewick to the Land of Toys, becomes a donkey, joins a circus, and becomes a puppet again. In the last chapter, out of the mouth of The Terrible Dogfish with Geppetto, finally stops being a puppet and becomes a real boy.

Some literary analysts have described Pinocchio as an epic hero. Like many Western literary heroes, such as Odysseus, Pinocchio descends into hell; he also experiences rebirth through metamorphosis, a common motif in fantasy literature.

The structure of the story of Pinocchio follows that of the folk-tales of peasants who venture out into the world but are naively unprepared for what they find, and get into ridiculous situations. At the time of the writing of the book, this was a serious problem, arising partly from the industrialization of Italy, which led to a growing need for reliable labour in the cities; the problem was exacerbated by similar, more or less simultaneous, demands for labor in the industrialization of other countries. One major effect was the emigration of much of the Italian peasantry to cities and to foreign countries such as the United States.

The main imperatives demanded of Pinocchio are to work, be good, and study. And in the end Pinocchio's willingness to provide for his father and devote himself to these things transforms him into a real boy with modern comforts.